How Do You Get to Carnegie Hall?

Carnegie PlaybillPractice helps. But there’s a much easier way, and I imagine a much more common way: You pay for it.

From its beginning, Carnegie was a rental hall.  I looked up the price for renting it, should you feel so inclined. Without putting in a lot of effort, I found the going price in 2014 for the Stern auditorium (the main stage) for a Friday or Saturday evening was $16,000.

Not sure how many hours that covers, but remember you can do anything you want and no auditions required. You could even play your kazoo, if you wanted.

Another option – and this is the one Husband chose – is to join a choir that’s been invited for a special event. Continue reading “How Do You Get to Carnegie Hall?”

New York State of Mind

Screen Shot 2017-04-18 at 9.24.21 AMThis coming Saturday, in the wee hours of morn, I’m boarding a plane for New York City.

The reason?

Hold onto your hats: Husband is singing at Carnegie Hall!

WHOA!!!

To answer the probing questions you haven’t asked yet, it all started about a year ago… Continue reading “New York State of Mind”

Extroverts Are Cute

sunshine-2Recently I volunteered at a community concert thing-a-ma-jig. Lest you imagine that makes me a caring, noble creature, I did it because it got me a free ticket to the thing-a-ma-jig.

They asked me to usher, which just goes to show how little they knew me. Somehow I thought I’d be alone in a ticket booth, or maybe asked to count money (which between you and me, I really like to do). As it was, my main job was standing at a door and tearing tickets in half.

It’s a tough job, but someone’s gotta do it.

With me was a little-old-lady named Lorraine. She stood about four feet tall and I’m guessing weighed about 80 pounds. Lorraine’s job was handing out the programs. She also smiled constantly, greeted each patron and chatted. A lot. Lorraine was chatty.

I don’t know about you, but when I meet a really chatty person — such as Lorraine — I assume they’re not the brightest bulb in the socket. (It’s a prejudice of mine, I know.) Turns out Lorraine had been a concert organist, holds a doctorate in Music music-notesPerformance, played with the Michigan Symphony and taught at Arizona State.

She contracted polio as an infant and was in an iron lung for … um, a long time. I don’t remember the specifics. She also went through two bouts of cancer and is a firm believer in the medicinal value of lemon peels.

My part in the above conversation primarily consisted of: “Oh really? … Huh … Yeah … That’s interesting … Uh-huh … Yeah … Wow … Really? … Wow …”

I think if I were a psychologist, I would make a study of extroverts. Of course, the tricky thing would be to find a way to study them where they didn’t rush over to me, ask me how I was doing, perform a song and dance for me, and proceed to introduce me to every blame person in the nearby vicinity who they only just met a short while ago but are now their life-long friends.

I mean, my God, who are these people?! Where do they come from?

And where do they get all that energy? 🙂